Description

This is a very rare Welson Jazz Rekord from 1963 with a Sunburst finish.

First of all there aren't many of those still alive, on top of that, finding one in such a good state with all the electronics working perfectly is close to impossible. But we did it !

What you get is a wide range of 60's Surf-Rock sounds and a great playability (after our luthier set it up).

Anne Saillard from the band The Wave Chargers tries it out in our shop !

And for those of you who don't know about Welson Guitars (and well...you should), here's a little recap on the gistory of this brand :

The trade name Welson belonged to a Castelfidardo-based accordion making company founded by Orlando Quagliardi in 1921.

The company was among the very first ones to enter guitar manufacturing in the area. I’ve seen old Welson acoustic archtops, quite similar to mid-50’s German-made instruments, that looked as old as the earliest examples of Eko 100.

Its first electric solidbodies (1962-1964) make Welson appear to be some kind of a subsidiary to the Bartolini-Gemelli galaxy, though some details betray a care of seriousness that put those guitars apart and is typical of Welson. After 1964 the initial design evolves without discontinuity towards a second generation of generally sunburst finished solidbodies, equipped with more conventional controls than the previous pushbuttons stripes.

In this second half-decade the focus in the manufacturing program shifts gradually towards semi-acoustic archtops, mainly a classic single cutaway jazz box and a ES-335-inspired thinline, both being aimed at professional musicians. Welson takes at that time a status like being Italy’s Gibson. The instruments, acoustics included, are brandmarked with some kind of austere luxury ugliness (just like Gibsons indeed).

In the early 70’s Welson made LesPaul and SG copies, as could be expected, then specialized on electronic keyboards. However some kind of custom shop was maintained throughout the 70′s to supply high quality boutique guitars. The Quagliardi company ceased activity in 1981.
This maker used mainly two pickup models during the 60′s. First were used the same twin coil items as Crucianelli, Bartolini, Gemelli and others, with just another packaging (Welson choose a sort of wafer or caterpillar embossed metal cover), then after 1967 humbuckers, easy to identify with their six screws and the two part magnetic bar, of truly exceptional quality (no noise, high output). Here again the comparison with Gibson comes to mind.

While Quagliardi and Welson accordions never were really common, Welson guitar production reached a large scale, in Italy second only to Eko and Crucianelli. But rather than struggling for 1 percent sales share in music shops of Milan or Rome the company preferred to concentrate on remote markets, taking advantage of the image of near professional seriousness associated to its instruments. Welson guitars are easy to find in France, Belgium and Holland, they are not rare in the rest of the Western world… with the ironic exception of Italy, where they are virtually ignored.

The early marble and glitter guitars were also marketed in the US of A. under the Beltone brand, and special versions were made for Hopf of Germany. In 1964 a small batch of primitive single-cutaway jazz boxes was supplied to Vox UK.

Towards the end of the decade a violin-shaped series of guitars and basses was manufactured for the American distributor Orpheum while modified versions were made for the Italian company Meazzi, that also included in its range various Welson made acoustics.

The trade name Welson belonged to a Castelfidardo-based accordion making company founded by Orlando Quagliardi in 1921. The company was among the very first ones to enter guitar manufacturing in the area. I’ve seen old Welson acoustic archtops, quite similar to mid-50’s German-made instruments, that looked as old as the earliest examples of Eko 100.

Its first electric solidbodies (1962-1964) make Welson appear to be some kind of a subsidiary to the Bartolini-Gemelli galaxy, though some details betray a care of seriousness that put those guitars apart and is typical of Welson. After 1964 the initial design evolves without discontinuity towards a second generation of generally sunburst finished solidbodies, equipped with more conventional controls than the previous pushbuttons stripes.

In this second half-decade the focus in the manufacturing program shifts gradually towards semi-acoustic archtops, mainly a classic single cutaway jazz box and a ES-335-inspired thinline, both being aimed at professional musicians. Welson takes at that time a status like being Italy’s Gibson. The instruments, acoustics included, are brandmarked with some kind of austere luxury ugliness (just like Gibsons indeed).

In the early 70’s Welson made LesPaul and SG copies, as could be expected, then specialized on electronic keyboards. However some kind of custom shop was maintained throughout the 70′s to supply high quality boutique guitars. The Quagliardi company ceased activity in 1981.

This maker used mainly two pickup models during the 60′s. First were used the same twin coil items as Crucianelli, Bartolini, Gemelli and others, with just another packaging (Welson choose a sort of wafer or caterpillar embossed metal cover), then after 1967 humbuckers, easy to identify with their six screws and the two part magnetic bar, of truly exceptional quality (no noise, high output). Here again the comparison with Gibson comes to mind.

While Quagliardi and Welson accordions never were really common, Welson guitar production reached a large scale, in Italy second only to Eko and Crucianelli. But rather than struggling for 1 percent sales share in music shops of Milan or Rome the company preferred to concentrate on remote markets, taking advantage of the image of near professional seriousness associated to its instruments. Welson guitars are easy to find in France, Belgium and Holland, they are not rare in the rest of the Western world… with the ironic exception of Italy, where they are virtually ignored.

The company gained acknowledgement from highly respected names in the industry such as Dynacord and Wurlitzer. The whole electric range was marketed in Germany in the years 1965-66 under the Dynacord logo. In 1967-69 Welson had with the American company Wurlitzer a similar agreement that included the acoustic range, while violin-shaped guitars and basses were distributed in USA under the Orpheum brand. There is remarkably not any difference between Welson branded instruments and the Dynacord, Wurlitzer and Orpheum versions.

The early marble and glitter guitars were also marketed in the US of A. under the Beltone brand, and special versions were made for Hopf of Germany. In 1964 a small batch of primitive single-cutaway jazz boxes was supplied to Vox UK.

Towards the end of the decade a violin-shaped series of guitars and basses was manufactured for the American distributor Orpheum while modified versions were made for the Italian company Meazzi, that also included in its range various Welson made acoustics.

Year Condition Color Case
1963 Very Good Sunburst Hard

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GUITARE COLLECTION
Daniel Zeiller
0033(0)145261414
PARIS, Ile de France
3:28 AM
Our shop is open from Tuesday to Saturday 10:15am to 1:00pm and 2:15pm to 7:00pm. Closed Sunday and Monday.

We accept credit card payment only via Paypal. Paypal address: guitarecollection@aol.fr We also accept money order and bank transfer. For a reservation, 10% payment is required. Balance must be paid off within 20 days.

Shipping by UPS We ship all over Europe, Canada and United States The shipping cost is the cost charged by UPS.

We check with the utmost care our guitar before putting them on sale. We can send you by email all information or desired photos. Our guitars are shipped quickly and our packages are very neat. Also, all sales are final and we do not accept returns.