Found 14 matches

1912 Epiophone Bowl-Back Mandolin

$2,995
This is the first and only Epiphone bowl-back mandolin I’ve ever seen, and is in fact by far the earliest fretted instrument of any kind I’ve ever come across from Epiphone. The company was started in 1911 by Anastasio Stathopoulo, its founding instrument builder. His son was Epaminondas, known familiarly as “Epi”, which is where the name Epiphone eventually came from. The earliest instruments...
See More >>

~1840 Schatz Guitar

$3,500
This is the famous “Headless Schatz”, not because it was a predecessor of Ned Steinberger or some such, but for the simple reason that its peghead is, well, lost. It is in beautiful condition otherwise, some top cracks which fortunately no one has ever attempted to work on; no back cracks; one repaired side crack where some finish has been gone through, to be touched up by a competent luthier....
See More >>

~1840 Schatz Parlor

$3,500
Henry Schatz was an early partner of CF Martin in New York in the 1830s, and later set out on his own, eventually moving to Boston in the 1840s. This example is equal to a size-2 Martin, extremely popular as a parlor guitar in the 19th-century. It has H.A SCHATZ BOSTON impressed into the center strip inside the back, clearly visible through the soundhole, and again on two of the back braces,...
See More >>

~1840 Schatz Guitar

$2,000
Henry Schatz was an early partner of CF Martin in New York in the 1830s, and later set out on his own, eventually moving to Boston in the 1840s. This example is the equivalent of a size-2 Martin, extremely popular as a parlor guitar in the 19th-century. It has H.A SCHATZ BOSTON impressed into the center strip inside the back, clearly visible through the soundhole, and also on the back of the...
See More >>

~1860 J. Howard Foote Parlor

$2,500
I’ve seen a few guitars with the J. Howard Foote marking, though none nearly as nice and unaltered as this. Foote was a musical instrument importer and retailer with shops in New York and Chicago, known for selling violins, banjos, and guitars. This one, like a few others I have seen, has stamped on its interior center-strip MADE BY / J. HOWARD FOOTE / NEW-YORK and CHICAGO, along with BINI'S...
See More >>

~1960 Fender Lap Steel Legs

$495
How many times have I seen Fender steel guitars with one neck, or two, or three or even four, that are for sale, EXCEPT…… the legs are gone? Dozens, that’s how many, and I’ve turned down buying every one of them; who could play one of those ultra-cool, fabulous sounding things when they have no legs? I’ve seen one very clever substitution, but those were made by a master machinist, not so common...
See More >>

1911 Martin 000-45 Case

$3,000
This is a most unusual item, and as rare a Martin guitar accessory as one can imagine. It is the original, end-loading leather case from the Martin 000-45 that was made, in 1911, for CF Martin III while he was in college at Princeton University, Class of 1916. While it is a 45-grade guitar throughout, in the interest of conservative taste he had it made without fingerboard inlays and certain...
See More >>

~1920 Radnazzo Parlor

$1,995
All you out there of Italian descent, or Italian-American descent (I’ve got some in my family as well), know full well that the name Randazzo is a not-uncommon one, especially here in New York. There's Randazzo’s Clam Bar out in Sheepshead Bay Brooklyn, near where I grew up and a place I still frequent; it’s a name heard often in these parts. But Radnazzo? I don’t think so, has got to be a...
See More >>

2017 Gold Tone CC-Tenor

$350
The Cripple Creek Tenor includes a removable resonator for increased tone and volume. This model has helped to start thousands on the tenor banjo and is used professionally all over the world. This 19-fret tenor banjo is normally tuned ADGC. w/bag
See More >>

~1940 Therese European Parlor

$1,295
A beautiful, if somewhat mis-conserved, 19th-century European parlor guitar, probably from the 1840s, somewhere in France, possibly Mirecort. The engraving on the mother-of-pearl border, the rosette, and peghead medallion is nothing short of spectacular, with roses-and-leaves motif (think Sir John Tenniel, from “Alice”), with the engraver having signed his (or her?) name in pearl over the tail...
See More >>

~1910 Penzel_Muller Guitar

$3,495
What we have here is something of a mystery. Penzel & Muller were well-known makers of clarinets ca. 1890-1950. They had a storefront here in New York City in the early 19th century at 368 Bowery, in a building that is long gone, and was very near the Cooper Union, a much-revered engineering school where Abraham Lincoln gave a famous speech in 1860, and which building stands to this day. The...
See More >>

1941 Gibson L-5

$50,000
This is a most unusual, extremely rare and certainly unique Gibson guitar, a complete L-5 with the then brand-new “small diagonal pickup” introduced in 1941. The entire body, and all of its internal structural components and its pickup cover, are made from a clear plastic, almost surely Lucite, the brand name of a polyacrylic developed by DuPont in 1936, and which incidentally replaced glass in...
See More >>

1928 Martin 00-44

$40,000
A little history: the style 44 guitar was suggested by Vadah Olcott-Bickford, a prominent teacher and concert and recording artist of her time. Ms. Bickford and her husband Zarvah produced many recordings between 1919 and 1922, and had a considerable amount of sheet music published as well. The guitars made for her and her students were required to be of the highest quality wood and...
See More >>

1927 D'Angelico Violin

$50,000
It is known that John D’Angelico, the most revered maker of carved-top guitars ever to have lived, started out by learning to make mandolins from his uncle, Raphael Ciani, here in the Little Italy neighborhood of New York City, sometime in the early 1920s. D’Angelico of course went on to world-wide acclaim for the magnificent guitars and occasional carved-top mandolins he made on his own,...
See More >>