Found 16 matches

~1938 Regal Dobro Gretsch

$750
The National-Dobro/Regal connection story is fairly well known in vintage guitar circles, but it's worth repeating. In the early 30s, the California-made National-Dobro resonator guitars were selling like hot cakes, so the Regal factory, in Chicago, was contracted to build the wood body, and install the metal parts shipped from California. In 1936, all California assembly had moved to Chicago. ...
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~1935 Kay Bronson Honolulu Master

$2,650
In the arms race to sell more guitars, and a time amplified guitars were only emerging, size mattered. And the Bronson jumbo from the mid-thirties was at the top of the heap at a whopping 16 1/2" across at the lower bout, and 4 5/8" in depth at the end pin. Its art deco influences are revealed in the copious use of abalone, engraved position markers and tastefully adorned head stock overlay. ...
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~1925 Lange Avalon

$365
Avalon Banjo Ukulele ca 1929 | Banjo uke of the type made by Wm. Lange in the 1920s and marketed by various jobbers. The rim is appears to be a walnut laminate with the inside and the stick painted black. The neck is likely three-piece walnut with the heel cap also painted black. The head stock face is painted black with 'Avalon' stenciled in white. What appears to be an inlay is...
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~1935 Oahu (Kay) Jumbo Style 68B

$2,250
OAHU Jumbo c. 1935 Style 68B (Kay) | $2250 | An argument can be made that The OAHU Publishing Co., Cleveland, Ohio, facilitated more acoustic guitars to be bought pre-WWII than any other company, and the company didn't even build guitars! With its origins in Michigan, and later moving to Cleveland, OAHU Publishing was essentially a music publishing company, selling sheet music, guitars and...
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~1939 Regal Dobro

$1,250
Regal 'Moon & Stars' Dobro - Round Neck c. 1929 | $1250 | The National-Dobro/Regal connection story is fairly well known in vintage guitar circles, but it's worth repeating. In the early 30s, the California-made National-Dobro resonator guitars were selling like hot cakes, so the Regal factory, in Chicago, was contracted to build the wood body, and install the metal parts shipped from...
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~1926 Stromberg-Voisinet The Olympian

$395
Stromberg-Voisinet The Olympian c. 1926 | $395 | The Stromberg-Voisinet company was a direct competitor to two other Chicago makers of the so-called catalog guitars, guitars built cheaply to sell cheaply to the mass market. The products weren't Martins, but were better built from decent quality materials than many 'cheap' guitars of post WWII. Most were ladder braced, and are often seen in...
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1926 Vega Little Wonder Guitar Banjo

$1,350
Vega Little Wonder Guitar Banjo 1926 | $1350 | Through the era of musical instrument production when banjo reigned king, companies produced scads of five, and later, four string examples. As banjo popularity waned, many banjo makers began to offer a six-string 'banjo guitar' to attract guitar players to the instrument. The Little Wonder guitar banjo was Vegas contribution, and it has...
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~1967 Harmony H1270

$725
Harmony 12-String H1270 1967 | $725 | The Harmony factory in Chicago was among the first to return to building a 12-string guitar post-WWII. Most were constructed from slab-sawn birch, and adorned with painted trim; a solid guitar for everyman back in the day. However, this model of Harmony 12-strings took it up a notch from its plainer/cheaper siblings. Both the Harmony and the...
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~1930 P.M.I. Co NY Collegiate 3/4

$475
Collegiate 3/4 Size Acoustic Guitar, PMICo N.Y. | We have a soft spot for the odd and unusual and this little guitar sure fits the bill. It's labeled 'Genuine Santacilla Guitar P.M.I. Corp N.Y.' and sports the familiar 'Collegiate' decal on the headstock. Who made it is up for debate, although an argument could be made for the Oscar Schmidt Company in Jersey City, NJ. A few clues to support...
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~1906 Weymann & Son Keystone State

$1,550
Weymann & Son Keystone State Parlor Guitar c. 1906 | Weymann and Son was a Philadelphia instrument maker and seller from about 1894 through 1930. Their instruments rivaled those of Martin in both workmanship and quality of materials. This example dates to about 1906. Weymann’s very early guitars did not have serial numbers, and they started adding them about 1900. Sometime around 1910...
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~1930 Oscar Schmidt Stella

$1,250
A Grand Concert-size Stella is automatically considered a pretty rare find; the addition of the deluxe fingerboard makes it rarer still. The Decalcomania ornamented instruments appeared in the 1920s, and were pretty typical on the Oscar Schmidt production line once the depression was in full swing. The ornamentation on cheaper birch was a more economical way to build a guitar than it was to use...
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~1923 Vega Style N

$325
All original Vega Style N from the 20s with serial # 57771. The 'N' was the Vega entry-level tenor, but nonetheless, constructed to a very high Vega quality. There are 26 hooks around the laminate rim, and 17 frets on the fingerboard. The head measures 10 15/16" and the scale length is 19 1/2". There is a 'No Knot' tail piece and planet type tuners. The banjo is in excellent, unmolested...
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~1930 Oscar Schmidt Floral Decalcomania

$775
In the throes of the Great Depression, many guitar makers altered their manufacturing to weather the hard times, some more radically than others. The Oscar Schmidt Company, in Jersey City, NJ, introduced a line of guitars produced from less expensive materials, but gave them a glitzy look to attract buyers in these grim times. These instruments were cataloged as 'Decalcomania', and the guitars...
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~1933 Oscar Schmidt Floral Decalcomania

Call
In the throes of the Great Depression, many guitar makers altered their manufacturing to weather the hard times, some more radically than others. The Oscar Schmidt Company, in Jersey City, NJ, introduced a line of guitars produced from less expensive materials, but gave them a glitzy look to attract buyers in these grim times. These instruments were cataloged as 'Decalcomania', and the guitars...
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~1920 Oscar Schmidt Sovereign

$2,050
From the Stefan Grossman Collection, an early and high-end Oscar Schmidt made acoustic guitar. The Schmidt company reserved the Sovereign name for its top-of-the-line instruments. This example has all the hallmarks of those instruments including select mahogany back and sides, mahogany neck, spruce top, fancy marquetry trim on the top and back, and a abalone tree-of-life fingerboard inlay. The...
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~1897 Unknown Buckbee style Open back

$450
Open back five-string banjo in the Buckbee style. The neck is nicely carved into a soft 'V' and is made from walnut with a thin veneer fingerboard. The rim is spun over with 38 brackets. The four head stock friction tuners appear original, and the fifth string friction tuner is a replacement. The rim measures about 10 3/4" and the scale length is ~ 25 1/2". The fingerboard measures ~1 1/4"...
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