Found 16 matches

1942 Gibson Kalamazoo KG-12

$1,675
Kalamazoo KG-12 1942 | This is one of the cleaner and more rare KGs we've seen in a while.  It was built at a time when World War II was beginning to absorb the bulk of the male workforce and affect assembly practices at the Gibson factory.   The KG-12 presents a few unusual features when compared to  a typical KG-14 built earlier in the production run, and was marketed as a higher quality...
See More >>

~1930 P.M.I. Co NY Collegiate 3/4

$475
Collegiate 3/4 Size Acoustic Guitar, PMICo N.Y. | We have a soft spot for the odd and unusual and this little guitar sure fits the bill. It's labeled 'Genuine Santacilla Guitar P.M.I. Corp N.Y.' and sports the familiar 'Collegiate' decal on the headstock. Who made it is up for debate, although an argument could be made for the Oscar Schmidt Company in Jersey City, NJ. A few clues to support...
See More >>

~1906 Weymann & Son Keystone State

$1,959
Weymann & Son Keystone State Parlor Guitar c. 1906 | Weymann and Son was a Philadelphia instrument maker and seller from about 1894 through 1930. Their instruments rivaled those of Martin in both workmanship and quality of materials. This example dates to about 1906. Weymann’s very early guitars did not have serial numbers, and they started adding them about 1900. Sometime around 1910...
See More >>

1927 Gibson GB-1

$2,475
The Gibson GB-1 (guitar banjo) was created to allow the guitar player to get the popular 'banjo sound'. The GB was made to Gibson's high standards, and today they are quite rare in the vintage market. The rim measures 11", surrounded by the flange with the six-sided cutouts common to the non-Mastertone rings. The head appears to be an older skin head in excellent condition. The neck is...
See More >>

1936 Gibson Kalamazoo KG11

$1,975
Kalamazoo KG11 1936 vbg #1307 | Gibson's Kalamazoo line was created to help the company weather the depression. The Kalamazoo flat tops lacked a truss rod, and were ladder braced, allowing for a less expensive guitar. The Gibson name was left off to avoid cheapening the Gibson brand. That said, the Kalamazoo line of guitars was produced with the same fine materials and craftsmanship as the...
See More >>

~1930 Oscar Schmidt Stella

$1,250
A Grand Concert-size Stella is automatically considered a pretty rare find; the addition of the deluxe fingerboard makes it rarer still. The Decalcomania ornamented instruments appeared in the 1920s, and were pretty typical on the Oscar Schmidt production line once the depression was in full swing. The ornamentation on cheaper birch was a more economical way to build a guitar than it was to use...
See More >>

~1971 Harmony H6341

$365
Harmony H6341 made in Chicago in the early 70s. This is a 000-size guitar, with a very nice neck feel and really good sound output. The guitar is all original with no evident repairs. We recently reset the neck angle for nice, low action, and glued a small crack under the fingerboard extension. There is a screw hole in the heel from a former strap button, and some of the white painted...
See More >>

1935 Gibson Kalamazoo KG11

$1,775
(vbg #1701) Gibson's Kalamazoo line was created to help the company weather the depression. The Kalamazoo flat tops lacked a truss rod, and were ladder braced, allowing for a less expensive guitar. The Gibson name was left off to avoid cheapening the Gibson brand. That said, the Kalamazoo line of guitars was produced with the same fine materials and craftsmanship as the regular Gibson line. In...
See More >>

~1923 Vega Style N

$325
All original Vega Style N from the 20s with serial # 57771. The 'N' was the Vega entry-level tenor, but nonetheless, constructed to a very high Vega quality. There are 26 hooks around the laminate rim, and 17 frets on the fingerboard. The head measures 10 15/16" and the scale length is 19 1/2". There is a 'No Knot' tail piece and planet type tuners. The banjo is in excellent, unmolested...
See More >>

~1930 Oscar Schmidt Floral Decalcomania

$775
In the throes of the Great Depression, many guitar makers altered their manufacturing to weather the hard times, some more radically than others. The Oscar Schmidt Company, in Jersey City, NJ, introduced a line of guitars produced from less expensive materials, but gave them a glitzy look to attract buyers in these grim times. These instruments were cataloged as 'Decalcomania', and the guitars...
See More >>

~1933 Oscar Schmidt Floral Decalcomania

Call
In the throes of the Great Depression, many guitar makers altered their manufacturing to weather the hard times, some more radically than others. The Oscar Schmidt Company, in Jersey City, NJ, introduced a line of guitars produced from less expensive materials, but gave them a glitzy look to attract buyers in these grim times. These instruments were cataloged as 'Decalcomania', and the guitars...
See More >>

~1920 Oscar Schmidt Sovereign

$2,050
From the Stefan Grossman Collection, an early and high-end Oscar Schmidt made acoustic guitar. The Schmidt company reserved the Sovereign name for its top-of-the-line instruments. This example has all the hallmarks of those instruments including select mahogany back and sides, mahogany neck, spruce top, fancy marquetry trim on the top and back, and a abalone tree-of-life fingerboard inlay. The...
See More >>

~1897 Unknown Buckbee style Open back

$450
Open back five-string banjo in the Buckbee style. The neck is nicely carved into a soft 'V' and is made from walnut with a thin veneer fingerboard. The rim is spun over with 38 brackets. The four head stock friction tuners appear original, and the fifth string friction tuner is a replacement. The rim measures about 10 3/4" and the scale length is ~ 25 1/2". The fingerboard measures ~1 1/4"...
See More >>

1965 Guild® F-212

$725
Guild began the manufacture of a 12-string acoustic guitar in 1964, and over the years the F-212 has become a workingman's twelve. This example is from the early years, 1965, and is, consequently, a great players instruments. The jumbo body is mahogany with a spruce top, and measures 15 9/16" across at the lower bout. The neck is three piece mahogany/maple with a Brazilian overlay on the head...
See More >>

~1921 Oscar Schmidt Sovereign

$1,350
At the turn of the nineteenth/twentieth centuries, there was a brief craze for double-neck guitars. Many quality instruments were produced during this period, including examples from top makers Gibson and Larson Brothers. Hundreds of mandolin orchestras had a least one harp or double-neck guitar, as evidenced by surviving photos. Guitar factories such as Oscar Schmidt jumped on the band wagon,...
See More >>

1933 Gibson L-50

$2,250
A stunningly clean example of a Gibson L-50 from the early 1930s. The FON, 416, makes this the earliest L-50 documented, as per the Spann book 'Guide to Gibsons'. That FON would place it in the Gibson logs as produced in 1933, although some would argue, due to its appointments, it's a '32. Regardless, it is the earliest incarnation of the L-50 manufactured in Kalamazoo. The benchmarks are...
See More >>