Vintage Blues Guitars
Tom Wentzel and Bruce Roth
717.917.3738
Lancaster, PA
5:20 AM
phone calls accepted 8 a.m. through 8 p.m. eastern time .. text or email anytime

Cash, checks, PayPal, money orders or bank wire. We don't accept credit cards at this point.

We ship usually within a day of payment. International customers, we are not CITES certified. Any guitar with CITES-protected materials (Brazilian rosewood, ivory et al) shipped outside the US will be shipped at the risk of the buyer.

Forty eight hour test drive on all instruments..if not to your liking, return for refund minus shipping costs.

Found 14 matches

~1946 Regal Junior Jumbo

$775
Regal ‘Junior Jumbo’ c. 1946 | $775 | The Regal company in Chicago produced scads of guitars throughout its almost one-hundred year run. This example came to be known as the ‘KG11’ shape ‘big bottom’ Regal, based on its body shape which echoed the Gibson ‘Kalamazoo’ KG11 of the 1930s. This shape first appeared with Regal about 1935 and continued into the 50s with various iterations and...
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~1970 Harmony H1270

$675
Harmony H1270 12-string c. 1967 | $675 | Harmony in Chicago was one of the first to begin again the manufacture of 12-string guitars post WWII. The Harmony ‘Stella’ H912 12-string was an all-birch bodied workhorse of a guitar during the baby-boom bubble and ‘folk’ era. By the mid-sixties, Harmony came out with the H1270 line of 12-strings, and they were a step up from the budget H912. The...
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1964 Martin 0-16NY

$1,950
Martin 0-16NY 1964 | $1950 | Some assert that the 0-16NY was the first attempt by Martin to recreate a guitar based on its ‘antique’ instruments no longer made. Introduced in 1961, with the ‘Folk Scare’ booming, Martin created a small-bodied guitar that was a nod to its older instruments thereby giving folkies a more ‘authentic’ instrument on which to strum their ballads and work songs. ...
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1942 Martin 000-18

$8,850
Martin 000-18 1942 | $8850 | This is one of 225 000-18s built in 1942 at the venerable C.F. Martin Guitar factory in Nazareth, PA. The 'triple 0' Martin has evolved into one of the more desirable guitars for discerning players due to its ideal size and balanced tone. This example conforms to all 000-18 specs of a wartime era Martin: mahogany back and sides, Adirondak spruce top with...
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~1960 Kay Jumbo Flat top

$375
Kay has a long history of making guitars for 'Everyman'. This example, from c. 1960, is just that .. a big guitar on a budget, affordable by most. Listed in Kay catalogs as "Master Size", the body measures 17" across at the lower bout, which makes it a big boomer. The body is spruce ply on top (ladder braced), and birch ply on sides and back, all finished with sunburst. The binding is white...
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~1938 Kay Aloha National Studios

$250
Aloha National Studios was similar is scope to the music schools that sprung up in the first quarter of the twentieth century, such as First Hawaiian Conservatory and OAHU. They didn't manufacture guitars, they simply had guitars rebranded, mostly by Kay in Chicago, and then sold them to students who enrolled for guitar lessons. OAHU is very well known, and many examples exist today. The Aloha...
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~1900 Unknown Brac Tamburitza

$450
This is both an unusual and early instrument from the Serbian/Croatian 'Brac' family of instruments, played as folk instruments in Southern and Central Europe. The Brac or Braatch, is slightly smaller than a standard guitar, the treble course doubled, and usually tuned to G, D, A, E. The Brac is frequently used as a lead instrument. Surprisingly, there are still active Tamburitza orchestras...
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1931 Gibson L-1

$3,250
1931 Gibson L-1 12 % off
Gibson L-1 1931 | $3250 | At the close of the 1920s, Gibson was expanding its line from the so-called ‘peanut-shape’ flat tops that had been in production for a number of years, to include a larger-body flat top acoustic guitar. The result was a lightly-built instrument with a very comfortable neck profile and good tonal balance across the spectrum, and still favored by guitarists today. ...
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~1935 OAHU 68B Jumbo

$795
OAHU Jumbo Style 68B (Kay) | $795 | An argument can be made that The OAHU Publishing Co., Cleveland, Ohio, facilitated more acoustic guitars to be bought pre-WWII than any other company, and the company didn't even build guitars! With its origins in Michigan, and later moving to Cleveland, OAHU Publishing was essentially a music publishing company, selling sheet music, guitars and...
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~1940 Vega C-46

$725
Vega C-46 Archtop Acoustic c. 1940 | A nice example of a fairly rare and well made guitar. Made in Boston, likely during WWII, based on the riveted tuners and wood on the tailpiece. Although much better known for their banjos, the Vega company produced a line of quality guitars, too. Back and sides are maple. Top is carved spruce. The neck is mahogany, with a Brazilian rosewood...
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~1935 Oahu (Kay) Jumbo Style 68B

$1,950
~1935 Oahu (Kay) Jumbo Style 68B 13 % off
OAHU Jumbo c. 1935 Style 68B (Kay) | $1950 | An argument can be made that The OAHU Publishing Co., Cleveland, Ohio, facilitated more acoustic guitars to be bought pre-WWII than any other company, and the company didn't even build guitars! With its origins in Michigan, and later moving to Cleveland, OAHU Publishing was essentially a music publishing company, selling sheet music, guitars and...
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~1930 Oscar Schmidt Floral Decalcomania

$775
In the throes of the Great Depression, many guitar makers altered their manufacturing to weather the hard times, some more radically than others. The Oscar Schmidt Company, in Jersey City, NJ, introduced a line of guitars produced from less expensive materials, but gave them a glitzy look to attract buyers in these grim times. These instruments were cataloged as 'Decalcomania', and the guitars...
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~1933 Oscar Schmidt Floral Decalcomania

Call
In the throes of the Great Depression, many guitar makers altered their manufacturing to weather the hard times, some more radically than others. The Oscar Schmidt Company, in Jersey City, NJ, introduced a line of guitars produced from less expensive materials, but gave them a glitzy look to attract buyers in these grim times. These instruments were cataloged as 'Decalcomania', and the guitars...
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~1897 Unknown Buckbee style Open back

$450
Open back five-string banjo in the Buckbee style. The neck is nicely carved into a soft 'V' and is made from walnut with a thin veneer fingerboard. The rim is spun over with 38 brackets. The four head stock friction tuners appear original, and the fifth string friction tuner is a replacement. The rim measures about 10 3/4" and the scale length is ~ 25 1/2". The fingerboard measures ~1 1/4"...
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