Found 19 matches

~1935 Stella Decalcomania

$1,650
The Oscar Schmidt company was founded in 1879, and by the 1920s it was quite prosperous. But Schmidt's death in 1929, and the economic destruction brought on by the depression resulted in the sale of the Schmidt factory. By 1935, the company was owned by John Carner and trading as "Fretted Instrument Manufacturers Inc." This guitar was built at the time of Carner's ownership, since it bears...
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~1930 Oscar Schmidt Stella Decalcomania

$3,600
Pre-WWII the Oscar Schmidt company produced guitars by the gazillions, and a satisfying number of them survive today. Consequently, for lovers of these old pieces, it's intriguing to examine the myriad iterations put out there by the ever-busy Schmidt production line. This particular example is composed of combinations not seen by this shop. It's a Grand Concert 12-String (BBQ Bob) from about...
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1967 Gibson B45-12-N

$1,450
In the very early 1960s, the the folk boom spiraling outward into pop-culture, Gibson jumped aboard the 12-string bandwagon. The B45-12 was essentially the J-45 jumbo body with a 12-string neck, and the 'N' serving as the 'natural' finish option. This example dates to 1967, based on the tuners and pick guard material, although this serial number was also used in 1963. The back and sides...
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1954 Martin 0-15

$2,350
The 0-15, in all its plainness, was pretty much Martin's entry level guitar, but by no means a less quality instrument than other offerings in the Martin line up. The 15 (and sibling 17) series Martins are prized by finger pickers today for their tone and ease of play. The 0-15 sports an all mahogany body, mahogany neck, Brazilian fingerboard, bridge and head stock overlay and ebony nut. ...
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~1930 Oscar Schmidt 12-String

$2,850
Meet 'Scarface', originating in the Oscar Schmidt factory in Jersey City NJ somewhere around 1930, during the 'Decalcomania' craze. The size was called Grand Concert in the catalogs, but are referred to as 'The BBQ Bob' model by many today, taken from the original bluesman BBQ Bob, who played this type instrument. The guitar remarkably retains its original components, including tail piece,...
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~1902 Grunewald 12-string

$3,650
This is an important and rare example of a 12-string parlor guitar made early in the evolution of the 12-string. The twelve-string guitar has had a somewhat murky history. The oft-told Mexican/Italian multi-course string idea has been a leading facet of that history. Recently, information gleaned from early music trade magazines and catalogs have come to light which support an additional...
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1935 Gibson TG37

$925
Gibson tenor guitar from 1935, the era of the best Gibson sunbursts!. The development of the tenor guitar allowed banjo players the ability to jump to guitar as musical tastes evolved through the '30s. Spruce top, mahogany back (flat) and sides, mahogany neck and rosewood fingerboard and bridge (with adjuster wheels). Original banjo-style tuners. This guitar has been well played through it...
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~1935 Gibson Kalamazoo KG11

$995
This is a mid-thirties KG11 with a very old refinish, from sunburst to natural. Very difficult to tell, it almost looks factory. Consequently, this becomes a very affordable KG11. All components are original, including the bridge and tuners. Only missing the end pin. Very structurally sound, no cracks or evidence of prior repairs other than the finish and a tiny hole drilled through the...
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~1957 Harmony Stella H929 3/4

$225
Harmony had a run of almost twenty-five years with the venerable H929 acoustic flat top, aimed at the beginning guitarist. Production ended in 1970. This example is a 3/4-size guitar, with size and scale length suitable for children or for use as a travel guitar. The model stamp inside is clearly visible, but the date stamp is vague. Based on the older 'Stella' font, and the lack of 'steel...
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~1930 Oscar Schmidt Floral Decalcomania

$775
In the throes of the Great Depression, many guitar makers altered their manufacturing to weather the hard times, some more radically than others. The Oscar Schmidt Company, in Jersey City, NJ, introduced a line of guitars produced from less expensive materials, but gave them a glitzy look to attract buyers in these grim times. These instruments were cataloged as 'Decalcomania', and the guitars...
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~1933 Oscar Schmidt Floral Decalcomania

Call
In the throes of the Great Depression, many guitar makers altered their manufacturing to weather the hard times, some more radically than others. The Oscar Schmidt Company, in Jersey City, NJ, introduced a line of guitars produced from less expensive materials, but gave them a glitzy look to attract buyers in these grim times. These instruments were cataloged as 'Decalcomania', and the guitars...
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~1920 Oscar Schmidt Sovereign

$2,250
From the Stefan Grossman Collection, an early and high-end Oscar Schmidt made acoustic guitar. The Schmidt company reserved the Sovereign name for its top-of-the-line instruments. This example has all the hallmarks of those instruments including select mahogany back and sides, mahogany neck, spruce top, fancy marquetry trim on the top and back, and a abalone tree-of-life fingerboard inlay. The...
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~1932 Oscar Schmidt Stella Decalcomania

$2,250
In the throes of the Great Depression, many guitar makers made changes to their production, some more radically than others. The Oscar Schmidt Company, in Jersey City, NJ, introduced a line of guitars produced from less expensive materials with a glitzy look. These instruments were cataloged as 'Decalcomania', and the guitars sported a range of decals, from minimal to way off the charts. This...
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~1920 Oscar Schmidt Sovereign Jumbo 12

$13,750
Oscar Schmidt Sovereign Jumbo (Stella) 12-String Ca 1920 | $13,750 | This is an iconic flat top acoustic 12-string with a storied history. Made in Jersey City at the Oscar Schmidt factory about 1920, this particular model, marketed as Auditorium size, was made most famous by bluesman Huddie Ledbetter, aka 'Lead Belly'. Subsequently, the 'jumbo' Stella 12-string has become the Holy Grail of...
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~1897 Unknown Buckbee style Open back

$450
Open back five-string banjo in the Buckbee style. The neck is nicely carved into a soft 'V' and is made from walnut with a thin veneer fingerboard. The rim is spun over with 38 brackets. The four head stock friction tuners appear original, and the fifth string friction tuner is a replacement. The rim measures about 10 3/4" and the scale length is ~ 25 1/2". The fingerboard measures ~1 1/4"...
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1965 Guild® F-212

$1,150
Guild began the manufacture of a 12-string acoustic guitar in 1964, and over the years the F-212 has become a workingman's twelve. This example is from the early years, 1965, and is, consequently, a great players instruments. The jumbo body is mahogany with a spruce top, and measures 15 9/16" across at the lower bout. The neck is three piece mahogany/maple with a Brazilian overlay on the head...
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~1960 DeArmond™ Guitar Mike

$325
DeArmond Guitar Mike 'monkey on a stick' pickup in overall good, functioning order, retaining felt pads. Some minor scratching and wear on the plating from use, and electrical tape on the insulation from the mounting on the guitar, and one small section of insulation chipped off (see photo). Pickup functions as intended and produces a clean sound through an amp.
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~1921 Oscar Schmidt Sovereign

$1,350
At the turn of the nineteenth/twentieth centuries, there was a brief craze for double-neck guitars. Many quality instruments were produced during this period, including examples from top makers Gibson and Larson Brothers. Hundreds of mandolin orchestras had a least one harp or double-neck guitar, as evidenced by surviving photos. Guitar factories such as Oscar Schmidt jumped on the band wagon,...
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1933 Gibson L-50

$2,450
A stunningly clean example of a Gibson L-50 from the early 1930s. The FON, 416, makes this the earliest L-50 documented, as per the Spann book 'Guide to Gibsons'. That FON would place it in the Gibson logs as produced in 1933, although some would argue, due to its appointments, it's a '32. Regardless, it is the earliest incarnation of the L-50 manufactured in Kalamazoo. The benchmarks are...
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